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Central California Woodcarvers

May 2011

Volume 19, Issue 5

In this issue

Club News

From the Meeting Minutes
News


On the day before Mother's Day (May 7th) we had 28 members at the meeting. The following was discussed.
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Lance Leitch brought up that the CCG (California Carvers Guild) will be having another Board meeting here on June 25. One of the Board member's husband is a bark carving teacher and would be willing to have a quick class on that day if we have members that would like to learn. If you're interested see Lance.
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The Fresno Fair, coming up this October, we may have a little bit bigger space available for us. We'll look forward to seeing what's in store.
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Master Carver Chris Pye of England was mentioned. He has produced many books and magazine articles over his 30+ years of carving and teaching. Now he also has a web site with numerous instructional videos that can be accessed with a monthly fee of $9.06 a month and you'll also be able to submit feedback and ask questions. The web site is:

http://www.woodcarvingworkshops.tv
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Guest Speaker

We had the great privilege of having Jerry Goertzen join us. He is a former member but had moved away some time ago. After Jim ran into him recently he agreed to come see us. For those that remember Jerry it was a time to catch up a bit. But for many of us it was wonderful to see and hear about Jerry's story and some of what the club had done in the past and see some of his carvings.

Jerry's interest in carving goes back to his high school days. He was also interested in guns and history. In addition, he had an interest in birds stemming from his work for California Fish and Game. But his interests phased more into guns, as he had always wanted a gun collection. Of course a carved collection of guns would fit more into Jerry's lack of independent wealth and with no need to shoot. He now has a whole wall of guns in his collection.

To make the guns look more realistic he wanted the gunmetal look. It took some experimentation to get it just right. Eventually he came up with using graphite with a clear coat over it. After being asked facetiously what his guns shoot, Jerry decided to carve some wooden "ammo" to go with his guns.

Fashion Fair had asked him to start showing his guns at certain events they would hold. Although, with his authentic looking paint job over equally authentic carvings, security was always checking his displays, not believing that they were ALL wood. He did do one carving without any finish to be able to see the wood. After showing at Fashion Fair for five or six years they told Jerry that he would not be allowed to have his guns in their show as they felt it would encourage the kids to violence. So ended an era.

Jerry talked about how he originally used soft woods for his guns and eventually started laminating soft woods for the base with hard woods for the details. Most of his guns are copied from pictures. Using a known dimension, such as barrel length, to get the picture to the gun's actual size in order to use it for his carvings. For many of Jerry's guns he has never seen an actual example of it in real life, his only reference has been through pictures.


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Show & Tell

CameraThree members had something to share with us during Show and Tell at the May 7th meeting.
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Stan Betts, interested in bark carvings, was trying to figure out what to do with a piece of bark he got. He saw a couple of hand carved pens (a turtle and an elephant) at Disneyland. Using them as inspiration he's begin to carve out a pen from his bark. He's still working on it. But it's "unique" enough that Stan is pretty sure no one will steal it from him when finished.
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Jack Lloyd took a two day class at the latest Oakhurst Rendezvous on flute making. The instructor made flute kits that were routed out halves of the flute which were glued together at the class then carved down.

Another item from the Rendezvous was a cap for a Cholula Hot Sauce bottle. You would pay $1 for a cap blank and after you turned in your completed carving you'd get your $1 back.
(Check out some pictures posted on Cholula Hot Sauce's Facebook page, including the winner.)
https://www.facebook.com/cholula/posts/158901234172964
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.222695807747651.74822.127782987238934

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Lloyd Moore brought in a White-tailed Kite. It's a graceful bird of prey that some mistake for a sea gull. Until fairly recently (1968) it was called a Black-shouldered Kite. Lloyd sketched it out and studied the Kite before he carved it.

Lloyd has "turned over a new carving leaf" pins collection. This was a project he did to support the Central Sierra Historical Society and Museum in Shaver Lake (at Camp Edison).

Lastly, he showed a walking stick painted in a patriotic color scheme and a cane made with a very light weight wood. (Has anyone noticed that lately Lloyd is showing up just about everywhere he goes?)
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Lighter Side of the Wood


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