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Central California Woodcarvers

September 2012

Volume 19, Issue 9

In this issue

Club News

From the Meeting Minutes
News


On September 1st there were 25 members at the meeting with the following discussed.
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The sign-up sheet for our booth at the Fresno Fair was started around. The raffle prizes for this year's Fair was shown. One of Lola Nelson's Deer carvings and an Eagle Head Cane which was being finished by Jim Hickey.

Show and Tell PictureShow and Tell Picture

We will have a lot more space this year due to others that have had booths in the past not being there this year. Just some of those not taking spaces are Pop Laval, the Fine Woodworkers, and the Home Arts office. As a result we will need a lot more carvings on display to fill the space. Anyone in the club, regardless of which county you reside in, is invited to bring their carvings in.

PLEASE NOTE: Despite the letter some of us received from The Fair, about dropping off your tools and parking at a remote location and shuttling to an entrance, parking will be the same as previous years. And the contest will be at 2:30 right after the October meeting.
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Again this month we're reminding you about the Cholula Hot Sauce competition in November.

A 2" X 3" block will be handed out which you will bring back in December for judging. Don't forget to check out the Woodcarvers Illustrated article from 2010 if you haven't already.
http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/patterns/carving-the-uncommon-bottlestopper.html

This will be judged at our December Party.
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In January, Bud Sanders will be giving a class on carving sweet potatoes.
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Bert passed out Basswood this month for egg carving. Remember that we're shooting for April for the egg contest with the last wood variety handed out sometime at the end of the year.
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Show & Tell

CameraTen members brought in something to share with us during Show and Tell. But first a correction to last month's newsletter. It was reported that Don Cathey had showed a carved ram. It was actually Tom Summerville that carved and showed it. Sorry for any confusion.
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Ton Summerville had a Mohawk Indian bust that he carved out of basswood. He used acrylic paint for some of the accents. Tom also had an Elk made from basswood with walnut antlers.
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Lance Leitch showed a bark carving of an Indian head. He sprayed it with a satin finish and noted that a bottle of glue was part of the process.
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Bert Frazier brought in a do-nothing he carved. He pointed out that it's a good project for those that can't carve faces. For this one Bert used butternut and finished it with tung oil.
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Lola Nelson had a mountain man and an Indian woman. The mountain man was carved out of basswood and painted with oil paints. The Indian woman was carved out of butternut and Lola burned in the hair, fringe, and design on the jug. She finished the piece with Deft semi-gloss.
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Ron Harbour brought back his work from last month, his eagle, to show us his continuing progress. All it has left is a star and final painting and he'll be sending it to his daughter in North Carolina when complete.
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Chuck Smith had seen a small table that his daughter-in-law's father had made that he wanted to replicate. After taking rubbings and pictures he built one, with some added embellishments of his own, out of butternut.
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Roy Smith was inspired by Ron Harbour's eagle plaque. Doing some research, Roy found that they are called "Bellamy Eagles" after John Haley Bellamy that is known for these highly stylized carved wooden eagles and he could carve one out in a couple of hours. Roy also brought in a book about how to carve Bellamy Eagles. The completed eagle was made out of two pieces of basswood which he finished with an amber shellac that he scoured and antiqued to give it an older look.
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Dick Nelson turned some candle holders out of pear wood that he showed. One with a walnut base with bamboo laminated around it. Dick also had a small jewelry box made from purple heart wood. He noted that it is a very hard wood.
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Lloyd Moore completed his mocking bird. He mounted the bird on a piece of trash wood that he covered with grass.
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Johnnie Grigsby brought in a cane stand he made that holds his canes at home. The stand can hold up to 9 canes although Johnnie has about 12 or 13 canes at home.
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Lighter Side of the Wood






PRIORITIES

Hundreds of years from now, it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove . . . But the world may be  different because I did something so bafflingly crazy that my ruins become a tourist attraction.

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